Wes Wyatt
Salem, Virginia, USA

 

Friday, January 14, 2000

After reading through the many comments in the aftermath of the Y2K scene I have several comments to make.

First of all, each of us has been presented with a tremendous opportunity for self-reflection. As a part of that process I would encourage one and all to step back and take a more objective (angelic even) view of Y2K.

What was Y2K supposedly about? A lack of vision. Programmers had not looked far enough ahead to see how their decision WOULD impact the many. Long range vision was lacking. Short cuts were taken. The end result was to be an inability for computers and everything connected to them to function correctly. The breakdown of systems. Mankind's Achille's heel in plain view!

What has actually happened?

Did Y2K not occur?

Was there no beast to slay?

No maiden in distress?

I doubt anyone can support that position who honestly and intelligently is willing to look at how much money, time and effort was put into actual Y2K 'corrections' and who pays attention to the behind the scenes story of minor glitches showing up.

What HAS actually happened?

What all of us hoped for the most: People did respond. Those in positions of leadership who knew that 'the buck stops here' did respond. (Albeit in the background and often without a willingness to publicly admit it.)

A GREATER communication happened between systems and PEOPLE -- worldwide.

I would encourage one and all to LOOK FOR THE DEEPER REASON FOR ALL OF THIS.

Maybe Y2K was not 'just' about the external world and potential catastrophe but instead (if a response was generated) WAS about creating a more connected, cooperative world from the INSIDE (from within the hearts and minds of people).

Maybe the greater shift was the one that occurred inside people and in how Y2K served a larger need -- the need for greater understanding and cooperation and not just locally but globally.

Think of humanity as a global fiber optics network that previous to Y2K was only marginally functional worldwide. Indeed, there were pockets not willing to be CONNECTED. As a result of Y2K the fiber optics network was expanded greatly. New relationships were built that would not have existed without it. Instead of the breakdown of systems, we were blessed with the increased communication between systems. Think of it as a software upgrade that allows for greater cooperation between people of different persuasions or who simply had never been introduced. The result: more systems and software can relate to one another more efficiently, more cooperatively and more effectively than previously possible.

Along with this pioneering connecting up (instead of disconnecting) with one another, many of the 'hubs' of the fiber optics network, those serving as 'communication hubs' (the leaders or those with vision) in different disciplines, philosophies and values, also were empowered by what occurred. I think we'll see those connections made between leaders, who previous to Y2K were simply operating as loners or in small groups, will play a crucial part in the near future. It will allow those with larger, more humane visions of what society can become to play a much larger role than would have been possible without Y2K.

Hey, it's a great thing to be a Y2K 'fool', if you just look underneath. Maybe there is hope for mankind after all! A gut check came and mankind DID respond. Maybe not as fully as many of us would like but hey, there was a pulse!

On the smaller scale of individuals taking steps to their family or just themselves, what was gained or lost?

As for external preparations (food, water, heat sources etc.), yes, some may have wasted time and money, but only if they allowed themselves to move toward a lifestyle they didn't care about, responding out of fear rather than with the motivation of sustaining a quality life for themselves and others.

Besides, the message was always being sent that no one is an island. Many offered the viewpoint that it was best to forge relationships and community awareness NOT just respond by trying to build a fortress (or become an island) of physical preparation.

For many the reason Y2K capivated and moved them to respond was because of the possibilities of moving society toward a greater awareness. Many prepared by moving CLOSER to how they really wanted to live. And that's a good thing.

For those who responded solely from a perspective of self-protection or self-interest. There remains the opportunity for self-reflection.

I for one would encourage them to NOT feel bummed out but to get the 'real' message of humanity's great need to foster communication and connection! We need one another. Period.

For those who were the leaders, the ones willing (or simply impelled by an instinct they didn't understand) to be the trumpet: Hey, don't lose sight of your original reasons and motivations for picking up the darn thing in the first place: The vision of a better world. The hope of moving it in that direction instead of toward disaster. The desire to empower others to take a greater responsibility for their life and the lives of others. A love of the Earth and it's diverse life systems.

In the end, the real message for those who cared enough and believed enough in the need for a response to Y2K was (regardless of what that response was): You can make a difference. You are more powerful than you think, particularly if you work together.

This is the only bunch of people I know who are harder on themselves when they succeed than if they failed! Lighten up. You wanted to prevent the larger catastrophe and you did. Rejoice. Come on guys and gals: Don't crap out when the gift is on the table in plain view. You succeeded. No one I know WANTED THE WORST CASE DISASTER SCENARIO OF Y2K TO ACTUALLY OCCUR. It didn't. We bring you tidings of great joy!

Take some credit AND CONTINUE TO LOOK INWARD FOR HOW YOU MIGHT USE THE EXPERIENCE TO CONTINUE TO DEEPER YOUR SELF RESPONSIBILITY AND RESPECT, YOUR VISION OF MAKING THE WORLD AND YOUR OWN LIFE A BETTER ONE.

With relief and appreciation,
Wes Wyatt
"Lighten Up & Take Some Credit"

After reading through the many comments in the aftermath of the Y2K scene I have several comments to make.

First of all, each of us has been presented with a tremendous opportunity for self-reflection. As a part of that process I would encourage one and all to step back and take a more objective (angelic even) view of Y2K.

What was Y2K supposedly about? A lack of vision. Programmers had not looked far enough ahead to see how their decision WOULD impact the many. Long range vision was lacking. Short cuts were taken. The end result was to be an inability for computers and everything connected to them to function correctly. The breakdown of systems. Mankind's Achille's heel in plain view!

What has actually happened?

Did Y2K not occur?

Was there no beast to slay?

No maiden in distress?

I doubt anyone can support that position who honestly and intelligently is willing to look at how much money, time and effort was put into actual Y2K 'corrections' and who pays attention to the behind the scenes story of minor glitches showing up.

What HAS actually happened?

What all of us hoped for the most: People did respond. Those in positions of leadership who knew that 'the buck stops here' did respond. (Albeit in the background and often without a willingness to publicly admit it.)

A GREATER communication happened between systems and PEOPLE -- worldwide.

I would encourage one and all to LOOK FOR THE DEEPER REASON FOR ALL OF THIS.

Maybe Y2K was not 'just' about the external world and potential catastrophe but instead (if a response was generated) WAS about creating a more connected, cooperative world from the INSIDE (from within the hearts and minds of people).

Maybe the greater shift was the one that occurred inside people and in how Y2K served a larger need -- the need for greater understanding and cooperation and not just locally but globally.

Think of humanity as a global fiber optics network that previous to Y2K was only marginally functional worldwide. Indeed, there were pockets not willing to be CONNECTED. As a result of Y2K the fiber optics network was expanded greatly. New relationships were built that would not have existed without it. Instead of the breakdown of systems, we were blessed with the increased communication between systems. Think of it as a software upgrade that allows for greater cooperation between people of different persuasions or who simply had never been introduced. The result: more systems and software can relate to one another more efficiently, more cooperatively and more effectively than previously possible.

Along with this pioneering connecting up (instead of disconnecting) with one another, many of the 'hubs' of the fiber optics network, those serving as 'communication hubs' (the leaders or those with vision) in different disciplines, philosophies and values, also were empowered by what occurred. I think we'll see those connections made between leaders, who previous to Y2K were simply operating as loners or in small groups, will play a crucial part in the near future. It will allow those with larger, more humane visions of what society can become to play a much larger role than would have been possible without Y2K.

Hey, it's a great thing to be a Y2K 'fool', if you just look underneath. Maybe there is hope for mankind after all! A gut check came and mankind DID respond. Maybe not as fully as many of us would like but hey, there was a pulse!

On the smaller scale of individuals taking steps to their family or just themselves, what was gained or lost?

As for external preparations (food, water, heat sources etc.), yes, some may have wasted time and money, but only if they allowed themselves to move toward a lifestyle they didn't care about, responding out of fear rather than with the motivation of sustaining a quality life for themselves and others.

Besides, the message was always being sent that no one is an island. Many offered the viewpoint that it was best to forge relationships and community awareness NOT just respond by trying to build a fortress (or become an island) of physical preparation.

For many the reason Y2K capivated and moved them to respond was because of the possibilities of moving society toward a greater awareness. Many prepared by moving CLOSER to how they really wanted to live. And that's a good thing.

For those who responded solely from a perspective of self-protection or self-interest. There remains the opportunity for self-reflection.

I for one would encourage them to NOT feel bummed out but to get the 'real' message of humanity's great need to foster communication and connection! We need one another. Period.

For those who were the leaders, the ones willing (or simply impelled by an instinct they didn't understand) to be the trumpet: Hey, don't lose sight of your original reasons and motivations for picking up the darn thing in the first place: The vision of a better world. The hope of moving it in that direction instead of toward disaster. The desire to empower others to take a greater responsibility for their life and the lives of others. A love of the Earth and it's diverse life systems.

In the end, the real message for those who cared enough and believed enough in the need for a response to Y2K was (regardless of what that response was): You can make a difference. You are more powerful than you think, particularly if you work together.

This is the only bunch of people I know who are harder on themselves when they succeed than if they failed! Lighten up. You wanted to prevent the larger catastrophe and you did. Rejoice. Come on guys and gals: Don't crap out when the gift is on the table in plain view. You succeeded. No one I know WANTED THE WORST CASE DISASTER SCENARIO OF Y2K TO ACTUALLY OCCUR. It didn't. We bring you tidings of great joy!

Take some credit AND CONTINUE TO LOOK INWARD FOR HOW YOU MIGHT USE THE EXPERIENCE TO CONTINUE TO DEEPER YOUR SELF RESPONSIBILITY AND RESPECT, YOUR VISION OF MAKING THE WORLD AND YOUR OWN LIFE A BETTER ONE.

With relief and appreciation,
Wes Wyatt
Salem, Virginia
wesleyrw@earthlink.net


 

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